Diagnosing Calcaneal Apophysitis

Severs Disease

Overview

Sever’s disease occurs in children when the growth plate (which is the growing part of the heel) is injured. The foot is one of the first body parts to grow to full size. This usually occurs in early puberty. During this time, bones often grow faster than muscles and tendons. As a result, muscles and tendons become tight. The heel area is less flexible. During weight-bearing activity (activity performed while standing), the tight heel tendons may put too much pressure at the back of the heel (where the Achilles tendon attaches). This can injure the heel and cause Sever’s disease.

Causes

There are many contributing factors that cause strain across the growth plate, making your child prone to developing Sever?s disease. These include repeated minor trauma to the growth plate from running or jumping sports, tight calf or hamstring muscles, rapid growth spurts can lead to the leg muscles becoming tight, increasing tension on the growth plate, tight Achilles tendon, the Achilles tendon attaches to the back of the heel adjacent to the growth plate, poor foot posture, may increase the strain on the growth plate, footwear with a very low heel pitch (eg soccer boots), unsupportive or unstable footwear with poor shock absorption at the heel, running or playing sport on hard surfaces.

Symptoms

The symptoms of Sever?s Disease may vary but usually include generalised pain and discomfort around the back of the heel. Can be one sided or both sides. Starts after child starts a new sport season. May cause child to limp due to pain. Increases with weight bearing activity. Heel becomes red and can be swollen. X-rays are usually inconclusive and simply show the growth plate.

Diagnosis

Your Podiatrist or Physiotherapist will assist in diagnosing the injury and the extent of the damage. From this, they will develop a management plan which may include rest or activity modification, soft tissue treatment such as massage and stretching, correction of biomechanics through heel raises or orthoses and the progression through a series of specific strengthening exercises.

Non Surgical Treatment

A physiotherapist will assess your pain, presentation and biomechanics. They can then treat your sever?s disease with hands on techniques which may include massage, manual therapy and taping. Your physiotherapist can then provide advice on what you can do at home to further progress your treatment, this may include stretching, strengthening and activity modification. In some cases orthotic prescription may be of benefit.

Prevention

Treat symptoms when they occur with RICE and NO HARM. RICE (Rest Ice, Compression and Elevation) will help following activity and when symptoms flare, while No HARM (No Heat, alcohol, running or massage) will help reduce the symptoms from occurring. Orthotics. The use of an Interpod Orthotic will assist in realigning the foot, which will reduce the stress on the Achilles Tendon and prevent reoccurring symptoms. The orthotic achieves this by reducing the forces and stress placed on the limbs during walking and running. Exercise reduction. Patients may need to reduce their level of activity if this is seen as a contributing factor. Training errors. Ensue athletes warm up and cool down correctly with stretching activities. Footwear. Sporting and school shoes should have an appropriate heel height to assist in offloading of the Achilles tendon.